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Sep

12

Greetings!

Posted By: admin on September 12, 2011 at 3:05 am

William B Hazel III MA MSW ACSW LCSW LADC

Greetings all, my name is Bill Hazel and I have thought a great deal of what I wanted to have on this website bearing my name. As a professional clinical social worker, counselor, guide, instructor and father I have seen, experienced and thought about many topics both theoretically and experentially. I will be covering many topics like various disorders, theories and techniques of counseling and subjects that I feel need greater exposure. One such subject that I feel needs greater exposure is PTSD. I’m sure many will immediately decry that they have read, have studied or experienced Post Traumatic Stress Disorder experienced by combat veterans, child abuse survivors, those who have experienced sexual harassment/assault and/ or interpersonal violence (formerly referred to as domestic violence).

That is not the topic I’m going to address today. I’m going to address on a regular basis that particular subject matter but infuse race, cultural differences, power, domination and subjugation. I would like to explore Post Traumatic Slave Disorder also known as Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. I think if we are honest with each other approaching this subject with an open mind and heart we can all achieved increased understanding. One of the pioneers of this discussion and a great source of inspiration for me for several years has been Dr. Joy Degruy, Professor of Social Work at Portland State University. Here are some of her contributions delivered through YouTube. With an era in which we have a President of The United States, President Barack Obama, an era with renewed suspicion and some open attacks on Affirmative Action policies and laws I feel we DO have problems. These problems will not simply go away. The causes of our separation have many roots, the solutions to these issues must also be multifaceted.

I hope as an African-American professional in the field of behavioral health with a wide variety of experiences can contribute to increased healing. Allow me to assist those who have not, or feel that they have not been included or recognized for their unique contributions. Allow me to serve as a bridge if you will to assist, teach, counsel and lay the foundation for success. Please enjoy the words of Dr. Degruy and I anticipate having the perspectives of many on this website. Please feel free to also visit my other website: Onlinehelp.pro where you can review my CV, see other videos and learn the many ways that we can hopefully build a partnership in making things better.

For the definitive authority on the subject of “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome” please go directly to the source where this wonderful teacher, professor, authoress can be contacted for questions, concerns and speaking engagements:

http://www.joydegruy.com/index.html


Post Traumatic Slave Disorder (Syndrome)

    Filed Under: Black History , Cultural Diversity , Help , Multiculturalism , PTSD-Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome Tagged with , ,
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Nov

27

Psychotherapy Eases Chronic Fatigue, Researchers Say

Posted By: admin on November 27, 2011 at 8:56 am

This is an interesting article written by David Tuller for The New York Times that discusses a study that may prove the efficacy of talk therapy in the treatment of individuals living with chronic fatigue syndrome. Cognitive behavioral therapies are being looked at with renewed interest. The use of gradual increases in exercise is also being viwed as helpful. A study currently being sponsored by the british government may ultimately lead to more cost effective treatment modalities.Several people living with this disorder object to the study citing the fact that it is not properly inclusive of the most ill of patients. Read the article to learn why certain unapproved medications are being rejected by health insurers and other third party payers.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Psychotherapy Eases Chronic Fatigue, Researchers Say

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Psychotherapy , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , ,
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Nov

26

Concern About Brain Surgery for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Posted By: admin on November 26, 2011 at 8:55 am

This interesting article was written by Benedict Carey for The New York Times. It discusses what some psychiatrists view as a the last possible hope cure for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder . This surgical procedure involves an operation directly on the brain. Other scientists say after hundreds have already undergone the pocedure not so fast. Please read and enjoy this article as we never know who might benefit from this information.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Concern About Brain Surgery for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Filed Under: Antisocial Personality Disorder , Anxiety , counseling , Help , Mental Health , MOOD DISORDER , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

25

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns to Drug Therapy

Posted By: admin on November 25, 2011 at 8:52 am

This article written by Gardiner Harris of The New York Times reiterates what we helping professionals already know. We have been aware for some years now that psychotherapy is now the province of primarily psychologists and social workers. Not meaning to get into a fight with other helping professionals here but social workers are the largest providers of mental health services (talk therapy) in The United States. Now having said that this article was indeed sad to read. It spoke of a psychiatrist who no longer finds it financially feasible to practice his craft, psychotherapy. Dr. Donald Levin reports that his practice is now relegated to approximately 12-15 minutes per patient daily where he primarily serves in a medication management role.

I posted this article for several reasons : To formally acknowlege what has oft been discussed in the circles of helping professionals that psychiatrists although invaluable in every arena of skilled provision for mental health care are no longer at the forefront of counseling and therapeutic service delivery. Other professionals must now be prepared (as if we have not for years) accept the gauntlet of stepping forward and serving as full partners in the assessment, diagnosing and treatment of mental health disorders. The article makes significant points that lacking a medical school education should allow us to provide less expensive fees to provide services for more people. We must recognize this and after a medical assessment do what we do best. The article speaks to the idea that there is no discernible difference in quality between the two professions (psychiatry and clinical social work or psychology). As the least expensive practitioners it should enable us to move forward in our areas of expertise , learn more serve more. Please enjoy this article.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns to Drug Therapy

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , ,
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Nov

24

For the Developmentally Disabled, Harm in Safe Havens

Posted By: admin on November 24, 2011 at 8:50 am

This article written by Danny Hakim for The New York Times reported on a subject which merits periodic review and if you’ll pardon my phrase dusting off. It discusses that subsequent to the desinstitualization or the closure of the former facilities (old warehouses) of the developmentally disabled the patients unable to be maintained at home with family were placed in community settings. Within these community settings are state employees who are at times untrained in the appropriate care of patients. This article reveals some staff have criminal convictions to include crimes of violence either related to or unrelated to their state jobs. This article discusses assaults, neglect, sexual abuse and other improprieties perpetrated by staff on the residents of these group homes. It reviews the relative inefficiency, mismanagement, fraud, waste and abuse by managerial personnel. It discloses an instance of efforts at whistleblowing to The Office of The Governor as well as state agencies which purportedly ensure the appropriate protection, care and safety of these clients. These whistleblowing efforts apparently have been met by retaliatory efforts by those exposed. This article should stimulate discussion and debate hopefully leading to much needed change! Please enjoy the article:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/13/nyregion/13homes.html

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

23

Emotional Power Broker of the Modern Family

Posted By: admin on November 23, 2011 at 8:49 am

This article written by Benedict Carey of The New York Times is a lighthearted but very real article which discusses the role of the family pet(s) and how they shape how we humans often interact. There is no question that the relationship between people and their pets often trancends that of people with each other. Please take a look at this article and decide if you potentially see yourself or others within the portrayals. I did and it was a true eyeopener. Please enjoy the article:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Emotional Power Broker of the Modern Family

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , , ,
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Nov

22

Les Murray and the Poetry of Depression

Posted By: admin on November 22, 2011 at 8:45 am

This book review written By Meghan O’Rourke for The New York Times Book Review outlines a book of poetry but shares also with us others with the major theme being depression. The author Les Murray has apparently written a series of tomes with anger and depression being centralized themes. It appears to be dynamic work which will contribute to our level of insight into the affective of one who lives with depression.

I post this piece because of past commentary indicating that a significant amount of readers fully identify with and would appreciating reading this art. Perhaps it should be stocked in the lending libraries of our offices, agencies and workplaces to help our clients normalize their experience. Please enjoy the review:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Les Murray and the Poetry of Depression

    Filed Under: counseling , DEPRESSION , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , , , ,
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Nov

21

For Some, Psychiatric Troubles May Begin With the Thyroid

Posted By: admin on November 21, 2011 at 8:45 am

This article written by Harriet Brown of The New York Times Health Section gives us helping professionals wonderful insight in how abnormalities in thryroid hormone levels can produce cognitive , mood, and other psychiatric difficulties.

Regulation of these hormonal imbalances can often produce positive results. This brings me back to my earliest formal study of psychopathology whereas a professor who truly made a significant impact on my professional thinking and in fact life always lectured that prior to any mental health work undertaken with a new or prospective client she insisted they undergo a thorough physical to rule out physiological origin of the complained malfunction.

Just goes to show always go back to the basics. Please enjoy this article:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

For Some, Psychiatric Troubles May Begin With the Thyroid

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy
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Nov

20

Modern Love Out of the Darkness

Posted By: admin on November 20, 2011 at 8:40 am

This piece of written by Mark Luckach for The New York Times and discusses his experience of caring for his wife with mental illness and his experiences with her both on and off medication. It is fascinating and provides us mental health professionals with much needed insight. I thank him for sharing this personal and poignant journey. Please enjoy the article:

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Modern Love Out of the Darkness

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , ,
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Nov

19

A Dangerous Method

Posted By: admin on November 19, 2011 at 8:39 am

This review of a movie was written by Terrence Rafferty for The New York Times’ Movie Section. It speaks to the beginning of psychoanalysis and looks like it may be pretty interesting. Please enjoy the review and if interested I’d love to read your impressions.

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

A Dangerous Method

    Filed Under: counseling , Help , Mental Health , Social Work , Therapy Tagged with , , , , ,
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Nov

18

Ross Truett Ashley, Virginia Tech Shooter, Described As ‘Friendly’

Posted By: admin on November 18, 2011 at 8:37 am

This story portrayed in The Huffington Post and written by Bob Lewis and Steven Szkotak presents a young man who people alternately described as a reserved and serious vs a fun loving man. It seeks to explore the final day that result ed in a homicide and suicide. What was it the drove this young man over the brink? Please review the article as we could find a similarly situated young client sitting before us telling us that everything is allright!

William B. Hazel, III,
ACSW, LCSW, LADC

Ross Truett Ashley, Virginia Tech Shooter, Described As ‘Friendly’

    Filed Under: Anger Management , Antisocial Personality Disorder , counseling , Help , Mental Health , MOOD DISORDER , PTSD-Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome , Rage , Social Work , Substance Abuse , Therapy Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , ,
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